blog

The Washington Post Exposes the War in Ukraine Is Being Prolonged on Purpose

The Washington Post has revealed that some of those who work within NATO, are trying to prolong the Russia – Ukraine war for as long as possible.

The Bezos owned Washington Post exposed that for the most part the war in Europe is a farce, designed to bring Russian President Vladimir Putin to heel. 

“There is an unfortunate dilemma. The problem is that if it ends now, there is a kind of time for Russia to regroup, and it will restart, under this or another pretext. Putin is not going to give up his goals.” The outlet quoted.

As reported by The Washington Post:

“We believe that our job is to support the Ukrainians,” national security adviser Jake Sullivan said this week. “They will set the military objectives. They will set the objectives at the bargaining table. And I am quite certain they are going to set those objectives at success, and we are going to give them every tool we can to help them achieve that success. But we are not going to define the outcome of this for the Ukrainians.” 

Some European countries, especially formerly communist ones with bitter memories of Russian invasion or occupation, are especially nervous about how the conflict will evolve, seeing themselves as next on the Kremlin’s target list. If Putin feels he has profited from the invasion, by winning territory, political concessions or other benefits, he may eventually be inspired to try the same thing against other neighbors, policymakers say.

“I hope they will be hard as steel. I support maximum military support and maximum sanctions,” Latvian Defense Minister Artis Pabriks said in an interview. “Russia must lose and criminals should stand in court.”

Even a Ukrainian vow not to join NATO — a concession that Zelensky has floated publicly — could be a concern to some neighbors. That leads to an awkward reality: For some in NATO, it’s better for the Ukrainians to keep fighting, and dying, than to achieve a peace that comes too early or at too high a cost to Kyiv and the rest of Europe. 



“Many of us have, and it’s absolutely human, a willingness to see that the war ends as soon as possible, that people are not suffering, not dying, and that there are no bombings,” said a senior European diplomat who, like others, spoke on the condition of anonymity to talk frankly about sensitive security issues. “There is an unfortunate dilemma. The problem is that if it ends now, there is a kind of time for Russia to regroup, and it will restart, under this or another pretext. Putin is not going to give up his goals.”

While U.S. officials say they are not trying to pressure Ukraine into a deal, the negotiations have been a frequent topic in the regular discussions between Secretary of State Antony Blinken and his Ukrainian counterpart, Dmytro Kuleba. Blinken has provided informal input about the talks during those calls. Kuleba will travel to Brussels to join the NATO meetings this week.

The Ukrainians have power of their own: Zelensky has been willing to criticize his Western backers when he has felt they weren’t doing enough to help him. If he publicized any attempt to pressure him to accept a settlement, or to reject one, that effort could backfire. And with Ukrainians doing the fighting, they aren’t as susceptible to Western pressure as weaker countries might be.

If Ukraine and Russia agree to a peace settlement, Washington and the European Union will face a separate question about whether to offer sanctions relief to the Kremlin. The answer is not an automatic yes, some policymakers said.

The war could have ended a month ago, when Putin said “if Ukraine agreed to recognize Crimea, accept Donetsk and Luhansk as independent states, swear off joining NATO and disarm.”

Zelenskyy turned down the offer, however, when the United States gave Ukraine $14 billion in aid. Which effectively prolonged the war.


Most Popular

These content links are provided by Content.ad. Both Content.ad and the web site upon which the links are displayed may receive compensation when readers click on these links. Some of the content you are redirected to may be sponsored content. View our privacy policy here.

To learn how you can use Content.ad to drive visitors to your content or add this service to your site, please contact us at [email protected].

Family-Friendly Content

Website owners select the type of content that appears in our units. However, if you would like to ensure that Content.ad always displays family-friendly content on this device, regardless of what site you are on, check the option below. Learn More



Most Popular
Sponsored Content

These content links are provided by Content.ad. Both Content.ad and the web site upon which the links are displayed may receive compensation when readers click on these links. Some of the content you are redirected to may be sponsored content. View our privacy policy here.

To learn how you can use Content.ad to drive visitors to your content or add this service to your site, please contact us at [email protected].

Family-Friendly Content

Website owners select the type of content that appears in our units. However, if you would like to ensure that Content.ad always displays family-friendly content on this device, regardless of what site you are on, check the option below. Learn More

3 Responses

  1. No European or Asian nation should ever lose sight of the great Ukraine mistake. We’ve all heard that Ukraine surrendered all its weaponry based on a promise that no other nation would ever be allowed to violate its sovereignty. International promises don’t mean scat to any nation however small and helpless it may be.

  2. This Administration giving anyone Advice is a Recipe for Disaster! They Cannot Solve Any Problems even if They had the Answers written out for Them!

  3. The article conflates Russia with the invasion of the Communist Soviet Union. I experienced being in both Soviet Germany and modern day Russia (twice). The atmosphere under Soviet control was VERY scary and depressing – spotlights, machine guns, just like you see in the movies. Modern Russia is 180 degrees opposite and was an extremely pleasant place. I have several Russian/Ukrainian friends (most are now here in the US) with family still in Ukraine. Everybody has an opinion but her family in Ukraine doesn’t feel targeted by Russian troops at all. They honestly feel that they would be better off if Russia were to take over their corrupt globalist installed Ukrainian government. Ukrainians are essentially Russians who never want to experience communism again (I don’t blame them) but from what I can tell (and the thoughts from Russians) is that he is anti-communist and anti-NWO/globalism. Most Russians love Putin – he treats his people well. For example, a few years ago, he encouraged families, children, gun ownership by private citizens, gold savings by the citizens, etc. Putin is attacking the corrupt Ukrainian govt officials who have been installed by people like Soros, he is not after Ukrainian citizens. The media considers the rebels fighting on behalf of the Ukrainian govt to be “citizens”, hence the “Russian soldiers are killing Ukrainian citizens” stories.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.